By AMBER GINTER

Southern Ohio Today


Josh and Taylor Ayers now laugh at how a kayaking trip turned date completely changed the lives of the Russellville farmers.


As a third-generation cattle farmer who thought he wanted little to do with the farm life, Josh Ayers left for the University of Cincinnati. After five years in the city and earning his engineering degree, however, a farm back home came up for sale, and he knew that was his chance to get back to his family roots.


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By AMBER GINTER

Southern Ohio Today


Nestled behind the beautiful sugarloaf mountains, Naz Vineyard and Winery in Kingston is preparing for this year’s Halloween event.


Na zdravie, (naz dra’-vee-ah), which means cheers in Slovak, is owned and operated by Jack and Cindy Mergo. With 10 acres of grapevines, their family business functions as a family-friendly winery rooted in Slovakian style.


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By AMBER GINTER

Southern Ohio Today


To combat the high number of overdoses in Southern Ohio, communities can help by participating in local drug take-back events to reduce the number of old, expired, or unused medications discovered and then sold on the streets.


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By AMBER GINTER

Southern Ohio Today


The Ohio State University Extension Office of Pike County creates education and wellness opportunities in a variety of ways. From 4-H bake sales to virtual field trips, free classes, and vendor fairs, 2020 may mark a year hit by a pandemic, but OSU continues its efforts to serve the community.


Helping people explore how science-based knowledge can improve social, economic, and environmental conditions, The Ohio State University Extension Office of Pike County has been busy.


The program is a non-formal educational youth development initiative offered to individuals from kindergarten through 19. Family and Consumer Sciences Educator Tammy Jones and Ag and Natural Resources Educator Will Hamman lead the program.


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By AMBER GINTER

Southern Ohio Today


Most business owners know that attracting women is crucial to their success, but one downtown Chillicothe business is taking it to another level.


ALPHA Femme Boutique, a store for women by women, stocks their shelves with 90 percent of items made by women-owned small businesses. 


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By AMBER GINTER

Southern Ohio Today


Ever wondered what living in a real-life scary movie or haunted house would be like? A Chillicothe business offers that experience in a family-friendly and safe environment.


"We give adults, teens, and children family fun entertainment without the crowd," said Matthew Cordial, Owner at Go Free Yourself Escape Room.


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Study of late night comics finds few Biden jokes

By DAVID BAUDER 

AP Media Writer


NEW YORK — From the perspective of late-night joke writers, there's really only one person running for president.


A staggering 97% of the jokes Stephen Colbert and Jimmy Fallon told about the candidates in September targeted President Donald Trump, a study released Monday found.


That's 455 jokes about Trump and 14 about Democrat Joe Biden, according to the Center for Media and Public Affairs at George Mason University. That doesn't even count 64 jokes made about Trump's family or administration, the study said.


“When Trump's onstage, everyone else is blacked out,” said Robert Lichter, communication professor at George Mason.


He's been studying late-night humor and politics since 1992. Republicans are usually targeted more than Democrats by the comedy writers, but the difference has never been this stark. The closest was the 2016 campaign, when Trump was the punchline for 78% of the jokes to Hillary Clinton's 22%, the center said.


That's good news if, like Biden, your goal is to essentially make Trump the central issue in the campaign. It may present a real challenge for the comics if Biden defeats Trump in next month's election, however.

What will they have to poke fun at?


“I think they will find a way to keep making jokes about Trump, even after he leaves office,” Lichter said.


There's precedent for that. In 2001, late-night comedians made former President Bill Clinton the subject of more jokes than his successor, George W. Bush, Lichter said.